Rider Recommendation: Prospect Park

While it’s often overshadowed by its more popular Manhattan counterpart, Prospect Park is one Brooklyn attraction that can’t be missed. Both parks were designed by Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux; however, these park masterminds actually considered Prospect Park to be their masterpiece, a chance to correct the mistakes they made when they designed Central Park a few years earlier. At first glance, these green oases are very similar but upon your visit you’ll find that Prospect Park is more “natural” than Central Park and much quieter. Make sure not to overlook these things the next time you stop by “Brooklyn’s backyard”:

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Grand Army Plaza

As the name suggests, Grand Army Plaza is the grandest entrance to Prospect Park (which has seventeen entrances total). It’s impossible to miss this massive arch with several bronze statues jutting out of it. Called the Soldiers and Sailors Arch, these statues give homage to the “Defenders of the Union” during the Civil War. The inner curve of the arch also features carvings of President Abraham Lincoln and Union General Ulysses S. Grant. If you’re brave enough to cross the busy intersection to get a closer look at the arch, you’ll also be treated to a small park separate from Prospect Park, decorated with other sculptures and a mermaid fountain.

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Prospect Park Carousel

Just a quick walk from the Prospect Park Zoo, is the wildly whimsical Prospect Park Carousel. This functional work of art has been a delight to both children and adults since the early 1900s. Like most other carousels, this one is equipped with a fleet of horses –53 in all– but quite unusually, it also features a deer, a giraffe, a lion, and two dragon chariots. Something else that makes the Prospect Park Carousel unique: it’s one of the few wheelchair-accessible carousels in the country. There’s no reason why anyone should miss out on the fun. 

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The Ravine

There’s a reason why Prospect Park is considered a “natural” parks. Unlike with Central Park where trees and bushes had to be imported, the designers of Prospect Park worked with Brooklyn’s native forests to create the woodsy Ravine. Step into the Ravine today and you’ll think that you’re in the Adirondack Mountains. Along with being a great place to escape the city without actually leaving, the Ravine is a prime spot for bird watching. While you’re there see what other wildlife you can spot. 

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Need a bike for your adventure through Prospect Park? Stop by one of our Unlimited Biking locations and we’ll set you up with the perfect ride.

A Cyclist’s Guide to the Jamaica Bay Greenway

Out of all of NYC’s “greenways” the Jamaica Bay Greenway is probably the only one that actually lives up to its name. This 19-mile cyclist and pedestrian loop in southern Brooklyn and Queens runs along a wildlife refuge that’s the largest of its kind in the city. The area is teeming with all sorts of fauna and flora, as well as a few historical gems. There’s a lot to see and do on one of the longest bike rides in the city, so here are a few of our recommendations that will help you make the most of your ride.

 

Go birdwatching at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge.

Birdlovers rejoice! The Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge is paradise for both birds and birdwatchers. Over 70 species of bird regularly nest within the refuge’s 9,000 acres, but over 200 species have been sighted here. Spend some time among the calm of the refuge’s wetlands, salt marshes, and woods and you’ll see warblers, egrets, all kinds of waterfowl, and much more. With all the wildlife around you you’ll forget that you’re in the city.

 

See antique planes at Floyd Bennett Field.

Floyd Bennett Field has had a lot of past lives. In 1928 it was a municipal airport, but during World War II the federal government decided it would be of better use as a naval air station. Today Floyd Bennett Field doesn’t see as much action, but it is dedicated to preserving the history of its glory days. Stop by the Field’s gorgeous art deco terminal, which has now become a museum of the airport’s history. Then check our Hangar B, where you can get up close to WWII -era planes. If you’re visiting on a Tuesday in the summer, don’t miss the 2.3 mile bike race around the field.

 

Venture through the abandoned ruins of Fort Tilden.

Unlike Floyd Bennett Field, this military base hasn’t been given a new 21st-century purpose. Ever since the base was decommissioned in 1972, the area is slowly being reclaimed by nature. If you’re a fan of venturing into abandoned buildings, Fort Tilden is the spot for you. Just beware of the poison ivy.

 

Take a swim at Jacob Riis Park.

Jacob Riis Park, like a lot of places around the Jamaica Bay Greenway, has a military backstory. This park was previously a naval air station but now it’s one of New York’s favorite public beaches. The relatively uncrowded beach and the art deco bathhouse are some of the main draws, but locals also take advantage of Jacob Riis’ opportunities for surfing and golfing, too. The 88-acre park is divided into 14 bays, but FYI, Bay 1 is considered the “adult” part of the beach, since it is frequented by nudists. 

 

Interested in biking the Jamaica Bay Greenway and seeing these sites?

Stop by one of our Unlimited Biking locations to pick up the perfect bike for your journey.

Biked the Brooklyn Bridge? Now Try These Brooklyn Bike Paths!

Most cyclists visiting New York are already aware of the Brooklyn Waterfront Greenway, the two mile ride from the Brooklyn end of the Brooklyn Bridge down to the neighborhood of Red Hook. But there is much more to cycling in Brooklyn than that. We’ve made a list of the best bike paths in Brooklyn that will help you explore this massive borough by bike.

Ocean Parkway Greenway

First on this list is the Ocean Parkway Greenway, which actually became the country’s first designated bike path in 1894. Like many of New York City’s beloved features, Ocean Parkway was designed by Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux, who aimed for Ocean Parkway to resemble the grand boulevards of Europe. See if you get these European vibes as you ride the five-mile lane from Prospect Park down to Coney Island.

 

Coney Island Boardwalk

Take in the ocean air and marvel at the world-famous amusement park as you ride down the Coney Island Boardwalk. Spanning from Sea Gate to Brighton Beach, this 2.1-mile path is only open to cyclists from 5 am to 10 am, but you’ll find that a ride over the Coney Island Boardwalk is a great way to start your day.

 

Shore Parkway Greenway

This 5.5-mile bike path is the most picturesque one on our list. As you follow the path down the southwestern coast of Brooklyn you’ll have views of the Statue of Liberty and New York Harbor, in addition to getting an up-close look at the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and Fort Hamilton, NYC’s only active military base. Take this ride around sunset for an especially memorable experience.

 

Prospect Park

No Brooklyn biking list would be complete without mentioning Prospect Park. Another urban gem designed by Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux, Prospect Park contains a 3.35-mile loop for cyclists that was recently declared car-free. While you’re there, don’t forget to check out Grand Army Plaza, the Prospect Park Zoo, and the Ravine.

 

In need of a bike that can withstand all your Brooklyn adventures? Head over to one of Unlimited Biking’s stores and we’ll get you sized for the perfect bike for your journey.

Already Biked the Brooklyn Bridge? Now Ride the Manhattan Bridge!

NYC has over 2,000 bridges but if you aren’t a commuter, then you’ve most likely only heard of one NYC bridge: the Brooklyn Bridge. To be fair, the Brooklyn Bridge is iconic; it was, arguably, the greatest feat of engineering of the nineteenth century. But if you only visit the Brooklyn Bridge during your trip to New York, you’re missing out. One other bridge definitely worth riding over is the Manhattan Bridge. Like the Brooklyn Bridge, the Manhattan Bridge spans over the East River to connect the boroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan, but that is where the similarities end. Read on to discover what makes the Manhattan Bridge a unique ride.

What to expect on your ride:

Compared to the Brooklyn Bridge, your ride on the Manhattan Bridge will be a breeze. Since the bridge isn’t a go-to tourist attraction, you won’t be competing for space with a crushing crowd of people. In fact, bikes have their own designated lane on the bridge barriered from the pedestrians. A couple of quirks of the Manhattan Bridge might make your ride less-than-idyllic, however: the B/D/N/Q subway lines uses the bridge to cross between Brooklyn and Manhattan, so be prepared for some rumblings from the trains every few minutes. Also, although the Manhattan Bridge gives you stellar views of lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, that view is somewhat obscured by the bridge’s chicken wire fencing.

Photo opportunities:

A little known fact, a ride over the bridge provides a great photo-op of the NYC skyline, as well as the Brooklyn Bridge. 

To get this must have shot, ride over to Washington Street between Water Street and Front Street. If you angle your camera just right, you’ll get the Empire State Building in the background, too!

Things to Do:

While you’re in the area, don’t forget to explore the neighborhoods of DUMBO, which stands for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass. You can take a boxing lesson at Gleason’s Gym, shop at Empire Stores, or spend some time at Jacques Torres’ chocolate paradise. In Brooklyn Heights, you’ll find even more cute boutiques, as well as kayaking and more outdoor fun at Brooklyn Bridge Park. 

On the Manhattan side of the bridge, you’ll find the ever-bustling neighborhood of Chinatown, where there’s great shopping and great food. Be sure to stop at the Original Chinatown Ice Cream Factory for unique flavors you won’t find anywhere else; walk along Canal Street and browse the never-ending supply of gods; and visit the Museum of Chinese in America where you’ll get context on the neighborhood as well a s the diverse stories of Chinese immigrant communities across the US. 


Ready to take a ride over the Manhattan Bridge? Visit any of our Unlimited Biking locations and we’ll get you set up with the perfect set of wheels for your day of exploration. And if you want to know even more about the Manhattan Bridge and the NYC’s many other bridges, book our Bridge Delight bike tour, where you’ll get to know the city through four of its bridges.

We love bikes…AND FOOD!

Interested in turning your All Day Bike Rental into a Self Guided Food Tour?

Here is our foodie bucket list with the ‘must eats’ and favorites from real New Yorkers!

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  • $1 Slice Pizza (2 Bros Pizza)
  • Cannoli (Ferrara Bakery & Cafe)
  • Bagel & Schmear (Black Seed Bagels)
  • Chicken & Waffles (Sweet chick)
  • Hand Pulled Noodles (Xi’an Famous Foods)
  • Shack Burger (Shake Shack)

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  • Corned Beef or Pastrami (Katz’s Delicatessen)
  • Dim Sum (Nom Wah Tea Parlor)
  • Chocolate Chip Cookie (Levain’s Bakery)

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  • Pierogi (Veselka)
  • Babka (Breaks Bakery)
  • Ramen (Ivan Ramen)
  • Ice Cream (Morgenstern’s, Ample Hills Creamery)
  • Fresh Pasta (San Marzano)

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  • Korean BBQ (Jongro BBQ)
  • Donuts (Dough Doughnuts)
  • Falafel (Mamouns)
  • Dumplings (Vanessa’s Dumpling House)
  • Shaved Ice (Grace Street Cafe)

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Now that you’ve got your list, get out there and eat! And we’ve got the bikes to get you there!

Get Your Blades On!

Did you know that rollerblading is not only a fun way to get around the city, but also a way to improve your balance and coordination skills like no other activity? 

Let’s take a minute to evaluate all the health benefits rollerblading will have on your body:

  • Rollerblading is a full body exercise
  • It’s easy on your body, but strengthens your muscles and cardiovascular system
  • Rollerblading is a great calorie burner

 

Some smooth rollerblading hot spots of New York:

Central Park

Whether you do the full loop of 6.1 miles or the smaller loop of 1.7 miles, Central Park is always filled with rollerbladers! Join the dozens of neon-clad party-goers at the public Roller Disco on Saturdays by the bandshell!

Note: Central Park has a counter-clockwise one-way-system. So always skate with the flow and pay attention to the pedestrians.

 

Hudson River Greenway

Welcome to the longest greenway in Manhattan, stretching from the George Washington to Riverside Park all the way down to Battery Park.

At the most southern point you will find the South Ferry Station. The ferry usually leaves every 30 min – 1h depending on the time of day and goes to Staten Island and back with passing by the Statue of Liberty, should you want to blade by Lady Liberty.

 

East River Greenway

Towards the end of the above mentioned, the Hudson River greenway will connect to the East River greenway at the intersection of Wall Street and South Street.

This greenway will lead you along the East Side from Battery Park back up to 125th Street in Harlem.

Note: There are some very narrow parts on the route, so do slow down for your own safety.

 

With all the fun always remember: Safety First

  • Wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads
  • Eyes on the street even if you are skating on a quiet path
  • If you skate one of the busier streets, skate with the traffic, provide signals so others know where you are planning on skating next
  • Be prepared for the dark in case you lose track of time: lights and reflective closing

Top 8 Movie Spots to Bike To

Katz’s Deli (When Harry Met Sally)

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Starring Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan, When Harry Met Sally is a quintessentially “New York” film. Following the relationship between the title characters over the space of twelve years, the film is the romantic comedy classic – which makes it the perfect film to start off this list!

Founded in 1888, it’s a popular spot for tourists and locals alike – so it hasn’t lost that homemade charm. Serving kosher-style Jewish meats (and monstrously big pastrami-on-rye sandwiches), this is a fantastic spot to soak up traditional New York vibes. It’s perfect for lunching between bike rides. You’ll have what she’s having, for sure!

 

Mulberry Street (The Godfather II)

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Little Italy is an exceptionally historical part of New York City. Named for the large number of Italian immigrants who came to live there at the start of the 20th century, the neighborhood has seen more than its fair share of gangster films centering around the Italian mob.

The Godfather II stars Al Pacino as he rises in the ranks of his father Marlon Brando’s mafia gang. One scene in particular features a stunning and terrifying shootout on Mulberry Street during the colourful Feast of San Gennaro, setting the stage for the drama to follow.

Cycle up to Mulberry Street and walk your bike down its bustling avenues, and see if you can spot the Mediterranean-inspired facades and food stores.

 

The Literary Walk & Bethesda Fountain (Big Daddy, Kramer Vs. Kramer, Maid in Manhattan, Gossip Girl)

Image result for central park literary walk moviesCentral Park has played host to countless films and television productions over the past century – and why not? The park is the endlessly beautiful epicenter of the city, and one of the largest urban green spaces in the world. If there’s any spots to bike to as a film fan, it has to be The Mall. It’s been the spot of nearly too many films, from comedies like Big Daddy and Maid in Manhattan to hard hitting legal dramas like Kramer vs. Kramer.

For the glamorous socialites in all of us, the Mall is capped at the north end by the Bethesda fountain. Fans of Gossip Girl will know it as the popular meeting location for Serena Van Der Woodsen and her friends, and the spot for the wedding of Blair and Chuck at the series finale.

 

The MET (Ocean’s 8)

Image result for the met museumContinuing on Central Park, another fantastic spot is the MET Museum. Home to an extensive collection of art and historical works, the MET is a highlight enough in itself. Not least for the legendary Gala it plays host to each year, with a unique theme and extensive celebrity guest list.

To add an item to the ever-growing list of reasons to visit this exceptional landmark, the 2018 action sequel Ocean’s 8 takes place within these very walls.

Lock your bike outside and take a stroll up the very same steps that Sandra Bullock, Anne Hathaway, and countless others have before.

 

FDNY Ladder 8 (Ghostbusters)

Image result for fdny ghostbustersIf Bill Murray ain’t afraid of no ghost, then YOU ain’t afraid of no ghost! The Fire Department of New York’s Firehouse Ladder 8 is the home base for history’s favorite: Ghostbusters. 

Cycle down Grand street and take a turn onto North Moore Street – you won’t be able to miss the sign!Pose outside with some of the best street art homages in the city, and enjoy stepping back to the 1980s.

 

The Staten Island Ferry (Spiderman: Homecoming)

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A fresh addition to the list of best New York places to take your bike is for sure the Staten Island Ferry. Take your bike from the mainland and relax as the completely free Ferry takes you around the harbor to see all of Manhattan’s incredible skyline.

Recent fame as a movie hotspot comes from it featuring in Marvel’s Spiderman: Homecoming. In a jaw-dropping fight sequence, Peter Parker saves the ferry passengers from the efforts of The Vulture by holding the Ferry together with his web. This is definitely one for the comic book fans and superhero movie buffs riding around NYC!

 

Spot the hottest movie locations and more, only with Unlimited Biking.

Our Favorite Unique NYC Guide Books

So you’ve already been to the Top of the Rock, sailed to the Statue of Liberty, and moseyed around the Met. Wondering what’s left to do in New York? Instead of turning to the typical guide book that will recommend the same ol’ tourist traps, why not crack open a more unusual guide? Below, we’ve listed some of our favorite offbeat NYC guide books that will turn your trip from typical to unique.

Secret New York: An Unusual Guide by T.M. Rives

If you’re looking for unusual activities to do around the city, Secret New York may be the guide book for you. Odds are you haven’t yet deciphered ancient riddles off of tombstones or tried to visit some of New York’s forbidden islands. These are only two of the many quirky activities to choose from within Secret New York’s 400 pages. With this guide, you’ll never be bored.

Off the Beaten (Subway) Track by Suzanne Reisman

It’s hard to find a NYC guide book that isn’t Manhattan-centric. Often, if they do mention attractions in the outer boroughs, they always list the same one or two things to see. Although Off the Beaten (Subway) Track, does have a hefty section of less-visited Manhattan attractions, it also supplements it with a few decently stocked lists of cool sites to see in Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and even Staten Island. We can bet that you haven’t yet been to the Poppenhusen Institute or the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument. See those sites and more with Off the Beaten (Subway) Track as your guide.

NYC Bouldering by Gaz Leah

New York City probably isn’t the first place that comes to mind when you think of extreme sports; however, reading NYC Bouldering by Gaz Leah will change your mind. Not only does this guide point out the city’s nearly hidden rock climbing boulders, it also explains the history tied to these sites. After rock climbing in Central Park, Fort Tryon, and Inwood Park, you’ll view New York City as more than a concrete jungle.

Quiet New York by Siobhan Wall

Keeping with the theme of breaking NYC stereotypes, Quiet New York will reveal a calmer side of NYC that you didn’t know existed. Discover a mix of gardens, cafes, museums, and cultural centers that will allow you to escape from the bustle of city life. The Mount Vernon Hotel Museum in Upper Manhattan, Dred Scott Bird Sanctuary in the Bronx, and Green-wood Cemetery in Brooklyn are among the places featured in this surprisingly dense book of quiet spots. Be sure to check it out if Times Square has got your head spinning.

Silver-Wheeled City: New York by Bicycle & Camera by Kevin Dann

Our list of unique NYC guide books would be incomplete without mentioning Silver-Wheeled City: New York by Bicycle & Camera. Written by our very own tour guide, Dr. Kevin Dann, Silver-Wheeled City leads readers through nine highly descriptive, guided explorations through New York that all can be done by bike. By the end of your trip, you’ll have a deeper appreciation of both New York City and your bicycle.

 

Experience all that New York City has to offer, and make it easier on yourself by stopping in to rent a bike with Unlimited Biking.

 

LGBTQ+ History Highlights

The Village may be the first area that comes to mind when you think of LGBTQ+ culture in NYC, but Central Park has also played a significant role in the city’s LGBTQ+’s history. In fact, in the 1970s, the first Gay Pride marches, then called the Christopher Street Liberation Day March, ended it’s annual celebration at the Park’s Sheep Meadow. But that’s not where Central Park’s connection with the gay community ends. Hop on a bike and venture further into Central Park with us as we explore the following notable LGBTQ+-related sites.

Bethesda Fountain

Bethesda Fountain, made iconic by the graceful sculpture of an angel that resides high above the water, is one of the Park’s most known sites. However, it isn’t as widely known that Emma Stebbins, the fountain’s sculptor, modelled the angel after her lover Charlotte Saunders Cushman. Cushman herself is noteworthy, not only for being an artist’s muse, but also for her career as a stage actress. During her time she was known for giving masterful performances in both men’s and women’s roles and she even gained the admiration of President Abraham Lincoln.

Hans Christian Andersen Monument

A further north into the Park, nestled in the shrubs next to a large pond where children sail model boats, you’ll find a bronze statue of the beloved Danish storyteller Hans Christian Andersen. Andersen, the creator of so many popular, but tragic, fairy tales, had an equally tragic love life, with many of his infatuations with women and men going unrequited. Although Andersen’s letters and diaries suggest that he was bisexual, the author remained celibate throughout his life. Some sources like to point to Andersen’s tale of The Little Mermaid as a reflection of the disappointments in his love life. Like how the mermaid was unable to be with her land-bound prince in Andersen’s original tale, neither was Andersen able to be with the people he fell in love with.

Now venture further into the city with us to discover more NYC sites that have made LGBTQ+ history. Keep in mind that this isn’t your usual sightseeing list: While Stonewall Bar and the gay-friendly neighborhoods of Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen are important to NYC LGBTQ+ history and culture, today we’re going to ride down a less explored path and discover a few surprising LGBTQ+ cultural sites in New York City.

Julius’ Bar

No LGBTQ+ landmark list would be complete without mentioning Stonewall Inn, which is celebrating the 50th anniversary of its famed uprising this year. But did you know that merely a block away from Stonewall sits the New York City’s oldest gay bar? Established in 1867, this bar is called Julius’, but it wasn’t always a LGBTQ+ friendly place. For decades gay patrons of Julius’ faced harassment and expulsion from the bar by the bartenders, who refused to let gay enjoy their drinks in peace. This changed in 1966 when three members of the Mattachine Society, one of the country’s oldest gay rights organizations, staged a ‘Sip-In’ at Julius’. The men sued the bar for denying them service on the grounds that they had the right to peaceably assemble in bars. Their victory in court led to the legalization of gay bars.

Christopher Street Pier

A quick bike ride away from Julius’ is a set of piers on the Hudson River waterfront collectively called the Christopher Street Pier. Since the 1940s, the Christopher Street Pier, also referred to as Gay Pier, has been an important part of the LGBTQ+ social scene, especially for young gay black and Latino men. Aside from still being a popular meetup spot, today the pier also features a memorial to the people who lost their lives in the 2016 Orlando nightclub shooting.

Carnegie Hall’s Studio Towers

From 1897 until 2010, the Studio Towers apartments on top of Carnegie Hall were home to some of the most talented LGBTQ+ artists in the city. Over the years Studio Towers residents included actor Marlon Brando, photographer Bill Cunningham, dancer Isadora Duncan, and composers Leonard Bernstein and Don Shirley. According to the NYC LGBT Historic Site Project, Bernstein and Shirley were the only residents to perform solo concerts at Carnegie Hall during their careers. Unfortunately, the days of living above Carnegie Hall are no more, as the Studio Towers were converted into classroom and rehearsal space. But as you stop by Carnegie Hall, look up and make a guess at how much these artists must have paid in rent.

The Plaza Hotel

The Plaza Hotel may be the most surprising inclusion on this list of NYC LGBTQ+ cultural landmarks, but the famous upscale hotel has been a quiet friend to the gay community since the early twentieth century. The Plaza’s Oak Room served as a discreet meeting place for well-to-do gay businessmen who wanted to avoid the risk of being arrested during the raids that commonly occurred at other bars with gay patrons around the city. In addition to this, in 1966 the Plaza also was the venue of openly gay writer Truman Capote’s legendary Black and White Ball, which was described as the “pinnacle of New York’s social history.” The Plaza Hotel made recently history again when it hosted the first gay wedding in New York in 2013.

Want to visit these sites as well as the other LGBTQ+ NYC landmarks we’ve mentioned?

Rent out a bike for the day from any one of our Unlimited Biking store locations and enjoy a day of easy traveling.

Five Best Locations to Bike in New York City

Even New Yorkers who were born and raised in the concrete jungle will admit that sometimes they, too, feel like tourists in their own city. Every corner turned reveals endless possibilities — broadway-worthy street performers, five-star quality meals compacted into tiny food trucks, unique characters that you wouldn’t believe existed unless you saw them for yourself. Walking through New York is an adventure in itself. Now imagine how the possibilities multiply when a bike is involved! Many neighborhoods in New York are extremely bike-friendly, even having their own designated lanes. We compiled a list of some of the best biking spots in New York City that both expert riders and beginners could enjoy.

1.) Hudson River Greenway

We want to start off this list with the one, the only, Hudson River. This 11-mile bike route is one of the most popular biking destinations in New York, and with good reason. The scenic landscape over the glistening river waters creates a spectacular juxtaposition alongside the iconic city skyscrapers. This location is greatly enjoyed and preferred by beginner riders since the entire trail has a designated bike path, meaning you will not ride on the street or encounter any cars along the way. The bike trail includes a two-lane path, allowing cyclers to ride back and forth as they please. A must-see along the Hudson River Greenway is Riverside Park, one of New York City’s most notable waterfront parks. This park is great for instagram-worthy photoshoots, soaking in the sun and taking in the magnificent view from all angles. We also encourage our travelers to visit the Intrepid Museum located right on the water of the Hudson River. This fascinating museum holds some of the most historically substantial American military and maritime artifacts and exhibitions.

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Rent bikes at our Hudson River location!

2.) Battery Park

The entire 11-mile Hudson River Greenway bike route may be overwhelming to beginner travelers. It is nearly impossible to take in all of the attractions at once so, we recommend our travelers to split up the route over a two-day span. Battery Park is located at the southern tip of the Hudson River Greenway and offers its own day’s worth of adventure. There are many stops along the bike route that we highly recommend seeing such as the Highline, Statue of Liberty and the Wall Street bull!

 

Statue Of Liberty, Landmark, Liberty

3.) Central Park

Central Park is a no-brainer destination in New York City, on bike or foot. With a 6-mile perimeter around the park, there is plenty to see and do. Lay in the green lawn of Sheep Meadow while taking in the breathtaking landscape of the surrounding city. A short trip away leads you to the remarkable architecture of the Bethesda Terrace which lies parallel to the Bethesda Fountain, a popular location for wedding shoots, graduation pictures and various movie scenes! Joining one of our Central Park Guided Bike Tours is a great way to learn about all of the famous landmarks hidden away in the tremendous park. You will be able to see all of the major sightseeing points in the park as well as other hidden gems, all led by one of our beloved local guides. 

Rent bikes at our Central Park Location!

4.) Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the most popular biking routes we offer at Unlimited Biking. The must-see scenery overlooks the East River and the city landscape, making it a highlight spot for photos. The bridge connects Manhattan and Brooklyn so you can explore both boroughs in just a few hours. With a distance of a little over one mile, the Brooklyn Bridge bike route is perfect for beginners. After riding the Brooklyn Bridge, make sure to explore the neighborhood of Dumbo full of unique art galleries, delicious NYC style pizza, and incredible architecture.

Book a Guided Tour with Unlimited Biking at the Brooklyn Bridge!

5.) South Street Seaport

Last, but certainly not least, is the South Street Seaport district along the East river of lower Manhattan. The Seaport district is a buzzing hub that highlights New York City’s vast culture, but also commemorates the area’s significant and fascinating history. Enjoy the sight of some of the oldest architecture in downtown Manhattan, an astonishing view of the Brooklyn Bridge and a leisurely ride along the bike lane on the boardwalk. As a central point for entertainment, shopping, and cuisine, South Street Seaport is definitely not a destination you want to miss!

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Rent bikes at our Unlimited Biking Seaport Location!

Our locations:

56 W 56th Street New York, NY 10019

346 W 57th Street New York, NY 10019

Pier 78 455 12th Avenue New York, NY 10019

111 W. 110th Street New York, NY 10026

38 Park Row New York, NY 10038

110 South Street New York, NY 10038